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To order your repeat prescription, please either sign up for online services or just call the POD.

The POD is a simple phone call, at a local rate, to order your repeat prescription.  

pod


We're delighted to report that the waiting time for a GP appointment, with one of our permanent GPs, is LESS THAN 2 weeks. 

In addition we can offer appointments wit our Advanced Nurse Practitioner within 1 week, and on-the-day appointments with our Nurse Practitioners, for any urgent concerns or minor illnesses!


Our GPs are increasingly being asked to complete reports and letters, and we wanted to take this opportunity to give some background and explain why we ask for 5 working days for such paperwork to be completed.  Thank you for your cooperation.

Time spent completing forms and preparing reports takes the GP away from the medical care of his/her patients.  Most GPs have a very heavy workload – Our GPs work to 60 hours per week and paperwork takes up an increasing amount of their time.  In addition non-NHS work must be undertaken outside of NHS contracted time.

The National Health Service provides most health care to most people free of charge, but there are exceptions.  Sometimes the charge is made to cover some of the cost of treatment, for example dental fees.  In other cases it is because the service isn’t covered by the NHS, for example, medical reports of insurance companies, claims on private health insurance and other letters and forms which require the doctor to review the patient’s medical records.

It is important to understand that GPs are not employed by the NHS, they are self-employed and they have to cover their costs – staff, buildings, heating, lighting etc – in the same way as any small business.

The NHS pays the doctor for specific NHS work but for non NHS work the fee has to cover the doctor’s costs.  Our fees are calculated based on our GPs Private hourly rate. 

What is covered by the NHS and what is not? 

The government’s contract with GPs covers medical services to NHS patients.  In recent years, more and more organisations have been involving doctors in a whole range of non-medical work.  Sometimes the only reason that GPs are asked is because they are in a position of trust in the community, or because an insurance company or employer wants to be sure that information provided is true and accurate.

Examples of non-NHS services for which GPs can charge their patients

 Certain travel vaccinations

  • Private medical insurance reports
  • Holiday cancellation forms
  • Referral for private care forms
  • Appropriate letters requested on behalf of the patient
  • In certain instances fitness to work forms

 Examples of non-NHS services for which GPs can charge other institutions are

 

  • Medical reports for an insurance company
  • Some reports for the DSS/Benefits Agency
  • Examinations of local authority employees

 

I only need the doctor’s signature – what is the problem?

When a doctor signs a certificate or completes a report it is a condition of remaining on the Medical Register that they only sign what they know to be true.  Therefore in order to complete even the simplest of forms, the doctor may need to check the patient’s entire record.  Carelessness or an inaccurate report can have serious consequences for the doctor, with the General Medical Council or even the Police.

STAFF TRAINING

We close our doors for Staff Training on a Tuesday Lunchtime from 1-2pm.

You will still be able to get hold of us on the phone for any urgent queries!

Thanks in advance for your co-operation, this will provide valuable time for our clinical  and admin teams to share good practice and develop our service.

Sickness Certificates

You do not require a doctor's sickness certificate for any illness lasting seven days or less. Your employer may however require you to complete a self-certification form (SC2) which is available from your employer or on the HMRC website.

Evidence that you are sick

Sickness CertificatesIf you are sick for more than seven days, your employer can ask you to give them some form of medical evidence to support payment of SSP (statutory sick pay).

It is up to your employer to decide whether you are incapable of work. A medical certificate, now called a 'Statement of Fitness for Work’ (see below) from your doctor is strong evidence that you are sick and would normally be accepted, unless there is evidence to prove otherwise.

You could also provide evidence from someone who is not a medical practitioner, e.g. a dentist. Your employer will decide whether or not this evidence is acceptable. If your employer has any doubts, they may still ask for a medical certificate from your GP.

Statement of Fitness for Work - ’Fit Note'

The 'fit note' was introduced on 6 April 2010. With your employer's support, the note will help you return to work sooner by providing more information about the effects of your illness or injury.

For more information see the DirectGov website (where this information was sourced)

 
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